AFAA Logo - a black and white image of a teary eye inside the map of the African Continent Adoption Programs

Americans for African Adoptions Inc. - Adoption Programs

ETHIOPIA, EAST AFRICA

The lead adoption program of AFAA is Ethiopia, East Africa. AFAA was the first of two licensed American adoption agencies to be approved to work in Ethiopia for American citizens living in and out of the U.S. AFAA has maintained a foster home in the capital city of Addis Ababa since 1987 - the "AFAA House" cares for 35 to 40 Ethiopian orphans. AFAA is a registered NGO (non-governmental organization) in Ethiopia. The Government of Ethiopia refers Ethiopian orphan children to AFAA.

After being medically screened, children live at the AFAA House while documentation for children and adoptive families is processed. The Ethiopian program and AFAA House are overseen by the Ethiopian equivalent of a registered nurse. Ethiopian foster mothers live at the AFAA House so children do not experience a staff change.

Waiting children are infants to 14 years old including some siblings. Children are medically tested. Time from dossier completion to child's arrival is approximately 9 to 12 months. Most of the children speak Amharic. School aged children attend an Ethiopian private school.

Single American women and American couples can adopt from Ethiopia. Adopting families should be 21 to 55. Divorce is allowed. There are no religious restrictions. Large families can adopt. Escorting is suggested.

Ethiopia was never colonized although Italy made a serious attempt.

LIBERIA, WEST AFRICA

AFAA established an adoption program for Liberian orphans in July 2001. An "AFAA House", in the capital city of Monrovia, cares for 30 to 35 orphans. Children live at the AFAA House while paperwork for the children and their adopting families is processed.

The Liberian program and AFAA House are overseen by a Liberian couple who spent 12 years in the United States before returning to their homeland. Liberia has been independent since 1847. AFAA is a registered corporation in Liberia.

Couples and single women from across the free world can adopt from Liberia. Single men are considered on a case by case basis. Adopting families should be 21 to 60. Divorce is accepted. There are no religious restrictions. Large families can adopt. Escorting is strongly encouraged.

Children are infants to 15 years, including siblings, including twins and occasional triplets. Children are medically tested. Time from dossier completion to child's arrival is approximately 6 to 12 months. Most children speak an accented English and local dialects. School age children are home-schooled by a Liberian teacher.

SIERRA LEONE, WEST AFRICA

AFAA maintained an "AFAA House" in the capital city of Freetown, Sierra Leone until May 9, 1997, when rebels had overrun Freetown and 18 orphans and our American AFAA representative were evacuated by U.S. Marines, via helicopter, to the U.S.S. Kearsage, a helicopter carrier steaming in for evacuations. The AFAA group was taken to the neighboring country of Guinea for six weeks until Cheryl and the American AFAA representative could bring the 18 children to their new American, Canadian and New Zealand families who met their children in Chicago, Illinois.

AFAA plans to reopen the Sierra Leone program. AFAA has been a registered NGO (non-governmental organization) in Sierra Leone since 1996. Most children speak a heavily accented English and local dialects. Sierra Leone gained their independence from Britian in 1961.

UGANDA, EAST AFRICA

Since 1991 AFAA has maintained an "AFAA House" in the capital city of Kampala, Uganda, for eight Ugandan orphans - six siblings and two unrelated children, now in their teens. The aunt of six of the children handles their care - she lives at the AFAA House with the children. A Ugandan social worker oversees the children's care and education. AFAA educates the children at private schools. Sponsorship is needed. The children speak English. Uganda does not allow adoption unless the adopting family lives with the child they wish to adopt, for three years, in Uganda. Uganda gained their independence from Britian in 1962.

MALI, WEST AFRICA

AFAA began in 1986 by placing children from Mali, West Africa. Mali has improved substantially and there appears little need for an adoption program. The Malian government's preference seems to be for French families to adopt the few orphans from their one small, Malian orphanage. Malians speak French and tribal dialects. Mali gained their independence from France in 1960.

SOMALIA, EAST AFRICA

In 1993 and 1994 AFAA placed three Somalian children from the capital city of Mogadishu. Arrangements were established with three Mogadishu orphanages to place additional children until sentiment turned against America and AFAA pulled out of Somalia. AFAA was a registered NGO with the United Nations in Somalia. Somali is the spoken language and some Italian. Somalia does not have an official government. Italy and Britian colonized Somalia. Independence was gained in 1960.

Many African countries do not allow adoption outside of their country. To date AFAA has found the following African countries do not allow adoption:

Burundi

Congo

Egypt

Eritrea

Ivory Coast

Kenya

Libya

Madagascar

Mauritius

Morocco

Mozambique

Rwanda

Sudan

Tanzania

Togo

Tunisia

Yemen

Zambia

Zimbabwe

 

 

AFAA continues to explore the possibility of new African adoption programs.
AFAA welcomes adoptive families for Ethiopian and Liberian children.

AFAA produces an 8 to 12 page annual newsletter called the "African Connection." Financial assistance is needed to make the "African Connection", a quarterly publication for the 8,500 U.S. and Canadian families on the AFAA mailing list.


Americans for African Adoptions, Inc. - 2012
8910 Timberwood Drive
Indianapolis, IN 46234-1952
Phone: 317-271-4567
Fax: 317-271-8739
amfaa@aol.com